Why Arduino

Why Arduino : Lesson 02

Why Arduino : Lesson 02

Arduino has been utilized in millions of projects and applications because of its simple and accessible user interface. Beginners will find the Arduino software simple, while expert users will find it adaptable. It is available for Mac, Windows, and Linux. It is used by teachers and students to create low-cost scientific equipment, demonstrate chemistry and physics principles, and learn about programming and robotics. Interactive prototypes are created by designers and architects, while musicians and artists utilize them for installations and to experiment with new musical instruments. Makers, for example, use it to construct many of the items on display at the Maker Faire. Arduino is a valuable tool for learning new skills. Anyone – youngsters, amateurs, artists, and programmers – may start experimenting by following the step-by-step instructions in a kit or exchanging ideas with other Arduino members online.

For physical computing, there are several additional microcontrollers and microcontroller platforms. Similar functionality may be found in Parallax Basic Stamp, Netmedia’s BX-24, Phidgets, MIT’s Handyboard, and other programs. These programs take the complicated aspects of microcontroller programming and put them in an easy-to-use format. Although Arduino simplifies the process of working with microcontrollers, it has several advantages over other systems for instructors, students, and curious amateurs:

  • In comparison to other microcontroller systems, Arduino boards are comparatively affordable. The Arduino module’s cheapest version may be constructed by hand, and even pre-made Arduino modules cost less than $50.
  • The Arduino Software (IDE) is cross-platform, running on Windows, Macintosh OSX, and Linux. The majority of microcontroller systems are only compatible with Windows.
  • The Arduino Software (IDE) is a simple, transparent programming environment that is easy to use for novices yet flexible enough for expert users. It’s built on the Processing programming environment, which is helpful for teachers because students learning to program in that environment will be familiar with the Arduino IDE.
  • Open-source and extendable software – The Arduino software is accessible as an open-source tool that skilled programmers may extend. C++ libraries may be used to develop the language, and those interested in learning more about the technical aspects can switch from Arduino to the AVR C programming language. If you desire, you may also include AVR-C code directly in your Arduino applications.
  • The blueprints for the Arduino boards are released under a Creative Commons license, allowing skilled circuit designers to create their version of the module, extending and upgrading it. Even unskilled users may build the breadboard version of the module to learn how it works and save money.